Age Discrimination

The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (“ADEA”) makes age discrimination illegal.  The ADEA prohibits discrimination against individuals over the age of 40.  Like the other discrimination laws, if you are over 40, your employer may not discriminate against you on the basis of your age, and you are also protected from harassment on the basis of your age.

Like the other anti-discrimination laws, the ADEA prohibits any type of adverse action against you because of your age including the failure to hire you or a discharge because of your age. This also includes age harassment, which typically involves hostility or abuse directed at you by other employees because of your age.  The ADEA also prohibits retaliation against you for complaining about age discrimination or for participating in someone else’s age discrimination case.

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National Origin Discrimination

National origin discrimination means treating someone less favorably because he or she is from a particular place, because of his or her ethnicity or accent, or because it is believed that he or she has a particular ethnic background.  National origin discrimination also means treating someone less favorably at work because of marriage or other association with someone of a particular nationality.

National origin discrimination can manifest itself in a number of ways such as English fluency and English-only rules as well as ethnic slurs.  Whatever the basis of the discrimination, your employer may not take adverse action against you because of your national origin.  This also includes harassment such as name calling or abuse because of your national origin.  Also, like the other anti-discrimination laws, the national origin discrimination rules also prohibit retaliation against you for complaining about national origin discrimination or for participating in someone else’s national origin discrimination case.

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Race and Color Discrimination

Title VII prohibits employers from discriminating against their employees “because of” their race or color.  Employers may not take your race or color or your perceived race or color into consideration in making employment decisions.

Race and color discrimination is not always obvious.  Sophisticated employers often engage in race discrimination through subtle practices that tend to screen out minority applicants and employees, such as job and intelligence tests, appearance and dress codes, English-only rules, relying on arrest records in making employment decisions, and discriminatory recruiting practices.

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Employment Discrimination

There are a number of federal laws that prohibit employment discrimination.  Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits discrimination against employees, former employees and applicants for employment on the basis of their race, color, sex, national origin, and religion. Since the passage of Title VII, Congress passed additional laws to expand the scope of the anti-discrimination laws in order to prohibit other forms of discrimination.  The Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) prohibits disability discrimination, and the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (“ADEA”) protects individuals over the age of 40 from discrimination.

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About Us

Thank you for your interest in Doyle, Barlow & Mazard PLLC’s employment law practice.  We understand how important it is to select a law firm that has specialized knowledge of the intricacies of employment law.

Doyle, Barlow & Mazard offers a wide array of services to individual employee and employer clients, including representing and counseling clients on potential discrimination, harassment and retaliation claims; performing wage and hour law and compliance audits; representing and counseling clients with respect to FMLA, Military Leave and return-to-work issues; representing and counseling clients with respect to the Americans with Disabilities Act and accommodation requests; representing and counseling clients with respect to employee hiring, performance, evaluations, discipline and terminations; representing and counseling clients on reductions in the work force, departmental reorganizations and acquisitions; performing worker classification and independent contractor classification reviews; reviewing, developing and updating employment policies and practices; reviewing, developing and updating employee handbooks; representing and advising employees on the legality of pending or actual terminations; negotiating improvements to employment and other agreements on behalf of individual clients; and drafting, negotiating, interpreting and enforcing agreements between employers and employees at all levels of an organization, including employment agreements, non-competition agreements, non-solicitation agreements, consulting agreements and separation agreements.

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